Researchers demonstrate a circulator on a silicon chip at mm-wave frequencies: Page 3 of 3

October 09, 2017 //By Jean-Pierre Joosting
Researchers from Columbia Engineering, led by Harish Krishnaswamy, associate professor of electrical engineering, in collaboration with Professor Andrea Alu's group from UT-Austin, claim to be the first to demonstrate a circulator on a silicon chip at mm-wave frequencies that enables nonreciprocal transmission of waves: device could enable two-way radios and transform 5G networks, self-driving cars, and virtual reality.

"For a smooth wireless VR experience, a huge amount of data has to be sent back and forth between the computer and the headset requiring low-latency bi-directional communication," says Krishnaswamy. "A mm-wave full-duplex transceiver enabled by our CMOS circulator could be a promising solution as it has the potential to deliver high speed data with low latency, in a small size with low cost."

The team, funded by sources including the National Science Foundation EFRI program, the DARPA SPAR program, and Texas Instruments, is currently working to improve the linearity and isolation performance of their circulator. Their long-term goal is to build a large-scale mm-wave full-duplex phased array system that uses their circulator.

Paper: DOI 10.1038/s41467-017-00798-9

Video: https://youtu.be/oh28N54DwLo

www.engineering.columbia.edu