Practical building blocks for a quantum internet

September 12, 2017 //By Jean-Pierre Joosting
A team of researchers at The Australian National University (ANU), led by Associate Professor Matthew Sellars, have taken a major leap forward to provide practical building blocks for a global quantum internet – by showing that an erbium-doped crystal is uniquely suited to enable a global telecommunications network that harnesses the weird properties of quantum mechanics.

"The effort to build a quantum computer is often described as the 'space race of the 21st century', but today's computers didn't realise their full potential until we had the internet," said Sellars, Program Manager in the Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) at ANU.

"We have shown that an erbium-doped crystal is the perfect material to form the building blocks of a quantum internet that will unlock the full potential of future quantum computers," he said in a video.

"We had this idea 10 years ago, but many of our peers told us that such a simple idea couldn't work. Seeing this result, it feels great to know that our approach was the right one."

The work, published in Nature Physics, demonstrates how to dramatically improve the storage time of a telecom-compatible quantum memory, a crucial challenge that has eluded researchers worldwide.

"A telecom-compatible quantum memory is a vital component for a practical quantum internet," said Dr Rose Ahlefeldt, DECRA Fellow at ANU and CQC2T.

"Memories allow us to buffer and synchronise quantum information, operations necessary for long range quantum communication."

"At the moment researchers are using memories that don't work at the right wavelength, and have to employ a complicated conversion process to and from the communications wavelength. This can be inefficient, and means they have to do three very difficult things instead of just one," she said.