How to prevent dropped communication in critical IoT applications: Page 3 of 3

July 14, 2020 //By Jason Tollefson, Sr. Product Marketing Manager, Microchip
How to prevent dropped communication in critical IoT applications
We've all had it happen: one minute we are talking on a mobile phone, and the next minute our call dropped, and we are disconnected. We feel inconvenienced when this happens. Perhaps we were in the middle of an important conversation, or worse, we were on a critical call with the police or the fire department. This experience that we have all shared also applies to the IoT products we design.

 

OK, I hear you now

By combining the excellent penetration of sub-GHzs with 802.15.4 mesh networking, the communication network is loud and clear. The signal is routed to the coordinator through the best path, infiltrating barriers, recovering from changes in the environment and preserving its power until it needs to send data. This combination results in a robust, reliable and long-life communication network.

 

Deploying robust IoT

Today, most 802.15.4 radios are based on 2.4 GHz and only take advantage of a few benefits we previously discussed. Products, like Microchip’s ATSAMR30 family of microcontroller units (MCUs), are integrated with IEEE 802.15.4 compliant radio for the sub-1 GHz frequency bands. There is a small module that can be easily implemented into applications offering regulatory certification for North America, Europe and China. With 256KB of flash, the ATSAMR30 devices can easily run mesh stacks such as MiWi, while still accommodating application code for security, home automation, lighting and metering applications.

 

Staying in touch

It’s important to communicate clearly and reliably, especially when the information can be life-changing. By using mesh networks based on 802.15.4 and sub-GHz frequencies, nodes will stay reliably connected within the IoT network. Networks like those offered in the ATSAMR30 family of MCUs with sub-GHz radio help ensure critical pieces are in place for information to be reliably transferred in changing environments when needed, all while sustaining long battery life.

 

Sources

802.15.4 Primer:
https://www.electronics-notes.com/articles/connectivity/ieee-802-15-4-wireless/basics-tutorial-primer.php

ISM Bands:
https://blog.pasternack.com/uncategorized/what-are-the-ism-bands-and-what-are-they-used-for

 

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