Piezoelectricity in a 2-D semiconductor holds promise for future MEMS: Page 3 of 3

December 23, 2014 //By Jean-Pierre Joosting
Piezoelectricity in a 2-D semiconductor holds promise for future MEMS
MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) switches are used extensively in RF applications due to a variety factors that include low power consumption, high isolation, low insertion loss (typically
Zhang, Zhu and their co-authors also discovered that if several single layers of molybdenum disulfide crystal were stacked on top of one another, piezoelectricity was only present in the odd number of layers (1,3,5, etc.)

"This discovery is interesting from a physics perspective since no other material has shown similar layer-number sensitivity," Zhu says. "The phenomenon might also prove useful for applications in which we want devices consisting of as few as possible material types, where some areas of the device need to be non-piezoelectric."

In addition to logic switches and biological sensors, piezoelectricity in molybdenum disulfide crystals might also find use in the potential new route to quantum computing and ultrafast data-processing called "valleytronics." In valleytronics, information is encoded in the spin and momentum of an electron moving through a crystal lattice as a wave with energy peaks and valleys.

"Some types of valleytronic devices depend on absolute crystal orientation, and piezoelectric anisotropy can be employed to determine this,' says Nature paper co-lead author Wang. "We are also investigating the possibility of using piezoelectricity to directly control valleytronic properties such as circular dichroism in molybdenum disulfide."

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